Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from Transplantation Research and BioMed Central.

Open Access Highly Accessed Commentary

Male human papillomavirus infection post-kidney transplant: an overlooked disease

Oksana Genzer1, Suzanne E El-Sayegh2, Morton J Kleiner12 and Mario R Castellanos13*

Author Affiliations

1 Division of Research, Department of Medicine, Staten Island University Hospital, 475 Seaview Ave. Staten Island, New York, 10305, USA

2 Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Staten Island University Hospital, 475 Seaview Ave. Staten Island, New York, 10305, USA

3 Division of Medical Women's Health, Department of Medicine, Staten Island University Hospital, 475 Seaview Ave. Staten Island, New York, 10305, USA

For all author emails, please log on.

Transplantation Research 2012, 1:21  doi:10.1186/2047-1440-1-21

Published: 16 November 2012

Abstract

While immunosuppressive regimens improve the overall survival of renal transplant recipients, they also contribute to the long-term complications of post-transplant malignancies. Chronic immune suppression in renal transplant recipients (RTR) increases the risk of viral-associated cancers. In male RTR, human papillomavirus (HPV) is implicated in the development of penile, anal, oropharyngeal, and non-melanoma skin carcinomas. Despite the significance of this virus in RTR, there is an overall deficiency in the understanding of the natural history of HPV infection in male RTR. In the next 20 years, it is believed that cancers will be the leading cause of death in kidney transplant recipients. HPV-associated carcinomas are of particular interest since they are sexually transmitted and in theory may be preventable diseases. This commentary highlights some of the progress made in understanding how HPV is transmitted amongst couples in the general population. It also summarizes the current knowledge of HPV infection in male RTR and describes the deficiencies in published medical literature.

Keywords:
Human papilloma virus; Post-kidney transplantation; Immunosuppression